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Fabulous Dami If you are looking for Sketch weed drawing ideas you’ve come to the right place. We have collect images about Sketch weed drawing ideas including images, pictures, photos,

Does smoking weed make people creative, or do creative people smoke weed?

A new study investigates if pot smokers outperformed nonsmokers in creativity.

Does marijuana boost creativity, or are creative people drawn to marijuana more than others?

A new study published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition suggests the latter: The results showed that pot smokers (sober at the time) outperformed nonsmokers at one of the two tests researchers used to measure creativity, and that the difference in creativity is most likely due to personality traits rather than pot itself. The study worked like this:

Researchers used the Big 5 model of personality to measure the personality traits of 979 undergraduate students. They then asked the group to self-report their own levels of creativity, and also objectively measured creativity among the students using two separate tests.

Two kinds of creative thought processes were measured to assess participants’ levels of creativity:

Divergent thinking — a thought process used to generate many possible solutions to a problem, like brainstorming. To measure divergent thinking, participants were asked to complete the Alternate Uses Test, in which they had one minute to generate as many uses for common objects as they could imagine.

Convergent thinking — a thought process that involves judging a finite number of solutions to arrive at one “correct” answer, like a multiple choice test. To measure convergent thinking, participants completed a Remote Associates Test, which “consists of three unrelated stimulus words, which are associated with a solution word.” For instance, the solution word for “cottage,” “Swiss,” and “cake” would be “cheese.”

The results showed that, while there was no significant difference between the two groups on the divergent thinking test, cannabis users outperformed non-users on the Remote Associates Test that measured convergent thinking.

What’s causing stoners to excel in this dimension of creativity? It’s mainly a personality trait called “openness to experience.” The researchers suggested:

“While mainstream media has propagated the idea that cannabis expands the mind and enhances creativity, our results show that the link between cannabis and creativity is largely a spurious correlation driven by differences in personality (i.e., openness to experience) that are related to both cannabis use and augmented creativity.”

As one of the dimensions in the Big 5 model of personality, openness to experience is characterized by active imagination (fantasy), aesthetic sensitivity, attentiveness to inner feelings, preference for variety, and intellectual curiosity. People high in this trait are also more likely to be liberal, extraverted, and tolerant of diversity.

Ultimately, the results don’t necessarily suggest that marijuana use has no effect on creativity.

“The answer isn’t black and white,” said Dr. Alice Weaver Flaherty, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital and professor at Harvard Medical School who specializes in deep brain stimulation and the brain’s relationship with creativity, to Artsy. “Marijuana is a stimulant. And most stimulants, in the short term anyway, boost output of all kinds.”

Flaherty argues that the question of whether marijuana use boosts creativity largely depends on the personality of the artist.

“A very anxious creative person may get some benefit from cannabis. In calming them down, it could help their creativity,” Flaherty said. “But for someone who’s already in the zone, and who’s not too anxious to work, it might push them into a place of being too laid back.”

Pot in the Creative Process

Looking beyond the scientific literature and into firsthand accounts, many artists claim marijuana plays a key role in their creative process. Alanis Morisette said smoking pot was a great way to get “clarity” and new perspectives when writing songs. Steve Jobs claimed smoking pot made him feel “relaxed and creative.” And comedian George Carlin deemed weed a “value-changing” drug that could open up “doors of perception,” as Alexxa Gotthardt notes in her article for Artsy.

Gotthardt’s article also features an interview with artist Gina Beavers, who proposed something that seems key in this debate about drugs and creativity: Getting high can sometimes be good for the idea-generation part of the creative process, not necessarily the execution of those ideas.

“If I smoke weed and then go to bed, I’ll have mild hallucinatory effects as I’m drifting off to sleep and get creative ideas. A few times, I’ve been mulling over how to solve some issue and weed will give me ideas, but not always ones I go with. I have to wait and look at the solutions in the light of day.”

Considering the plethora of mind-altering substances in the world — from Ayahuasca to Budweiser — should we think there’s anything special about marijuana when it comes to creativity? Couldn’t alcohol help artists be more creative, too?

Possibly. One hypothesis is that, because drugs can lower our inhibitions, they help to silence the self-editor that tends to harshly criticize what we create, allowing us to overcome writer’s block or simply the fear of creation.

Jason White, a Nashville-based singer-songwriter who likes to compose songs while drinking a glass of bourbon on his front porch, summed it up like this:

“I’m drinking to stop the noise in my head so I can express what I’m feeling in my heart.”

There’s an interesting caveat to White’s career: Although he was more of a whiskey drinker than a pot smoker, his biggest success in songwriting was influenced by marijuana and not alcohol, as Adam Wernick and Michael May wrote for PRI:

“Years ago, a friend left a marijuana bud on his coffee table. White wasn’t a pot smoker, but he popped it into a corncob pipe, lit it up, and in forty minutes wrote a song called Red Ragtop. The song became a huge hit for country singer Tim McGraw.”

For some more info, watch this:

Cancel culture vs. toleration: The consequences of punishing dissent

When we limit the clash of ideas, we ultimately hinder progress for the entire society.

  • Pluralism is the idea that different people, traditions, and beliefs not only can coexist together in the same society but also should coexist together because society benefits from the vibrant workshopping of ideas.
  • Cancel culture is a threat to a liberal society because it seeks to shape the available information rather than seek truth.
  • Practicing toleration for those ideas does not mean merely putting up with them but actually acknowledging the ideas with an open spirit, as Chandran Kukathas, professor at Singapore Management University, says.

“Cancel culture now poses a real threat to intellectual freedom in the United States,” Jonathan Rauch, distinguished fellow at the Institute for Humane Studies, writes in Persuasion. Rauch cites a Cato Institute poll that found a third of Americans worry their careers will be harmed if they express their real political opinions. Canceling is different than healthy criticism, Rauch writes, because canceling “is about shaping the information battlefield, not seeking truth; and its intent—or at least its predictable outcome—is to coerce conformity[.]”

And conformity is a death knell for liberalism. In a homogenous society—one in which everyone has roughly the same background, religion, values, and goals—people will generally agree on what it means to be a good person and live a good life. But a key tenet of liberalism is pluralism: the idea that different people, traditions, and beliefs not only can coexist together in the same society but also should coexist together because society benefits from vibrant heterogeneity.

“Liberal thinking really arises out of a reflection on the fact that people disagree substantially about things,” Chandran Kukathas, professor at Singapore Management University, says in a Big Think video on pluralism and toleration. “They have different ways of life.”

[Cancel culture] is about shaping the information battlefield, not seeking truth; and its intent—or at least its predictable outcome—is to coerce conformity[.]

Throughout history, men and women who’ve changed the world have been living examples of pluralism—people whose lives and minds were unique products of a diverse, interconnected world. Alexander Hamilton was, as the musical Hamilton says, “a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten spot in the Caribbean” before he came to the colonies. Marie Curie (neé Skłodowska) was the daughter of two Polish teachers, one atheist and one Catholic, and attended an underground university in Warsaw before immigrating to Paris. Sergey Brin was born in the Soviet Union to Jewish parents before his family fled persecution and came to the United States, where Brin co-founded Google.

A pluralistic society nourishes innovation and progress, where diverse people with unique life experiences develop and share ideas. If people stayed in discrete, homogenous communities, how many world-changing lives and ideas would never have existed?

Critics might say: It’s one thing to welcome people from diverse backgrounds into your society; it’s another to welcome diverse ideas, even if some are offensive or harmful.

But our vibrant, evolving world depends on diverse ideas and cultures. In a homogenous society, ideas and customs can be stagnant for generations. But in a pluralistic society, ideas and customs evolve by being brought into constant contact with alternative ideas and customs. In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill writes:

…the peculiar evil of silencing the expression of an opinion is that it is robbing the human race; posterity as well as the existing generation; those who dissent from the opinion, still more than those who hold it. If the opinion is right, they are deprived of the opportunity of exchanging error for truth: if wrong, they lose, what is almost as great a benefit, the clearer perception and livelier impression of truth, produced by its collision with error.

For humanity to benefit from pluralism—to benefit from the exchange of cultures and the collision of ideas—we must practice toleration. We must respect the rights of our colleagues and neighbors to think and live differently than we do.

When someone practices toleration, Kukathas says, they don’t just put up with something but actually acknowledge it “with a kind of open spirit.” Intentional, meaningful tolerance includes making an effort to understand others’ points of view. We don’t have to agree, but we should seek to understand. And, ultimately, we have to tolerate ideas we disagree with if we want to live in a flourishing and peaceful society.

This is what cancel culture robs society of—the healthy and essential practice of toleration, without which pluralism and a peaceful society cannot be sustained.

A new study investigates if pot smokers outperformed nonsmokers in creativity.