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Tall Flower Pots

For your tall flowers small flowerpots and vases just will not do. Instead we give you a nice selection of tall flowerpots. Now you can have your tall Flowers in a pot that will not fall over due to their height. The bases are weighted and reinforced so the flower will not tip over in the event of wind. see collection for all our tall flowerpots.

Tara is a San Antonio-based award-winning landscape architect, writer and educator, passionate about eco-friendly solutions and growing her own food. She knows all it takes to help you create a sustainable backyard retreat that combines blissful charm with a modern take on landscaping.

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  • Best Planter Pots

If you are looking for attractive garden solutions, this tall flower pot with a tin bucket is a perfect choice. The whole is intimately intertwined with every decor, beautifully exposing the vegetation.

Fiberglass Round – Tall Planter

Sifting through the Internet for tall flower pots? I’v stumbled upon these bronze tall planters and I already see them complement my modern outdoor patio décor – must hunt for similar tall modern planters!

Extra tall plant pots designed to bring colorful flowers and beautiful green foliage into any space. The pots come in a wide variety of sizes and their sturdy construction makes them a great choice for using outdoors. They are also customizable with additional paint if need be.

Give your home an all-natural feel with these wooden tall flower pots. The boxes are very compact and will take very little floor space. They also have that natural wood stain still intact that make them an all-weather option for any home.

With such a gorgeous flower pot you can easily improve the front of your house or your blooming garden. Designed for outdoors, the flower pot is tall yet stable, and able to easily hold even larger plants.

A garden vase with good proportions. This element serves as a flower pot. Its tall size makes it a beautiful focal point in a porch or deck. Durable construction and neutral brown color are the main features of this pot.

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Set of decorative fancy shaped trees. Every tree is inserted in simple, but elegant and flower pot – it is tall and covered with red enamel. They can be unique decoration both in your interior and in a terrace.

If you are into DIY constructions, this planters’ project shall appeal to you. Instead of buying large and expensive planters for your porch or veranda, why not make wooden ones on your own?

Attractive outdoor decorations. These flower pots are tall and they feature simple lines. This construction looks very attractive among many colorful plants and flowers. Each pot includes small legs for additional stability.

Add a dash of natural beauty and elegance into your spaces with this extra tall flower pots. Constructed from metal and featuring a recessed chrome-plated finishing, these pots come in a wide range of sizes and shapes too. They are also great to use outdoor, especially along the driveway or in the patio.

Large flower container: dark brown plant pot to be set on a floor of a patio, porch, terrace or any other outdoor location. I like the tall flower and green plants arrangement in it too. Truly striking.

Bold foliage plants in a large pot. @LaDonna Coy how about this on my front porch?

This so-called “Redhead” is a beautiful, versatile plant that can come in many different varieties and colour combinations with more being added each year. It is a large flower, ideal to accentuate your outdoor space.

Urn for the front door entrance

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How To Grow Box Grow In Pots

You do not have to be an educated florist to beautifully lay your flowers on the patio, or before entering the house. Using a tall flower pots you have a chance to highlight them. Black high flower pot, carved shape – will be a great finish of florist art.

Modesto Round Pot Planter

The tall pots are an excellent way to decorate the original garden, patio or terrace. Stylish oval design and beautiful details fascinate and sprinkle the plants that look perfect in them. Nice performance.

Tall pots fitted with holes. It is completely made of plastic. Great for growing tomatoes, strawberries and herbs. Received many positive recommendations from clients for high quality and modern design.

galvanized french flower buckets 7″: $2.99 9″: $3.55 11″: $4.50 13″: $4.99 15″: $6.50

Big garden pots with beautiful composition of flowers and green plants. The pots are finished charcoal black and they stand on big square stands which for sure guarantee the balance. They look great en masse.

A lovely decoration for outdoor areas such as patios, sun decks, porches, and backyards. Those tapered containers are made of quality white material, giving you capacious pots for growing and displaying your luscious greens.

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The tall grass in planter can be used next to the entry doors or in hall and foyer. This one create the spectacular look. Everyone will tell you, how beautiful it looks in your apartment.

A set of outdoor planters, filled with potted grass to provide a natural, wilderness-like vibe to the garden. The planters are made in an upside-down cone shape out of white ceramic and are best placed along a walkway.

Tall 3 Piece Round Pot Planter Set (Set of 3)

Find Tall Flower Pots. For your tall flowers small flowerpots and vases just will not do. Instead we give you a nice selection of tall flowerpots. Now you can have your tall Flowers in a pot that will not fall over due to their height. The bases are weighted and reinforced so the flower will not tip ov…

20 Best Tall Plants for Container Gardens

Tall potted plants can turn ordinary container gardens into works of art. They add height, variety, and a little drama to mixed containers. But grouping plants in containers takes a little finesse. The general formula is “thrillers, spillers, and fillers.” In other words, combine a tall (thrilling) focal point plant with something that spills over the side of the container to soften the lines. Finish with shorter filler plants in between. Virtually any plant can succeed in a pot under the right conditions. Here are 20 of the best tall potted plants to grow in a container garden.

Choose a pot that is large enough for the plant’s root ball as it grows. Also, make sure the container is heavy enough to anchor the plant.

Agave (Agave)

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Carol Sharp/Getty Images

If you garden in a warmer hardiness zone, you can’t go wrong with a large succulent as your focal point. And even if you live in a cooler climate, you can always grow a succulent as an annual or bring it inside for the winter. There are many agave species to choose from, ranging in size and appearance. Several commonly grown varieties reach a few feet in height and width. Agave can thrive in a relatively shallow, unglazed clay pot with excellent drainage. It prefers gritty soil, such as a cactus mix.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Foliage of greens, blues, and grays
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Sandy, well-draining

Amaranth (Amaranthus)

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The Spruce / Marie Iannotti

A tall amaranth, such as love lies bleeding (Amaranthus caudatus) or Joseph’s coat (Amaranthus tricolor), can add color and drama to a container garden, reaching heights of around 2 to 4 feet. Choose a container with adequate drainage holes, as amaranth likes to be moist but not sit in water. These are annual plants, so you will either need to start seed early or buy plants every year. But the nice thing about annuals is they allow you to experiment and be creative.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Foliage of greens, reds, purples, and yellows
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Average, moist, well-draining

Arborvitae (Thuja)

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J. Paul Moore/Getty Images

An evergreen as the centerpiece of a container garden is elegant, classic, and low maintenance. Choose one that will hold its shape nicely without a lot of pruning. A good option is ‘Emerald Green’ arborvitae, a semi-dwarf cultivar that grows in a narrow pyramid shape to around 7 to 15 feet tall. Plant it in a large pot with high-quality soil, and it should live in your container garden for many years.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 2 to 7
  • Color Varieties: Deep green
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Loamy, moist, well-draining

Bamboo (Bambusoideae)

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Alexandre Petzold/Getty Images

Bamboo can be a nightmare in the garden, spreading faster than you can control. But in a container, bamboo is a conversation piece. Some types prefer more temperate climates while others like heat and humidity. It’s the clumping varieties of bamboo, as well as the ones with smaller runners, that do best in containers. They might not grow to their fullest potential, but some still can reach heights of 10 to 20 feet. Just make sure you use a container with adequate drainage holes, as soggy soil can inhibit the plant’s growth.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Green, yellow-green
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Loose, slightly acidic, well-draining

Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)

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Big bluestem is a lovely ornamental grass that can adapt to a container. If you are mixing it with other plants use a large container, or big bluestem will crowd out its neighbors. This grass can grow about 4 to 6 feet tall with a spread of 2 to 3 feet. Make sure you don’t overwater or add too much fertilizer to big bluestem, as this can cause it to flop over. Likewise, too much shade can result in poor growth, so place the container where it will get at least six to eight hours of direct sunlight per day.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 4 to 9
  • Color Varieties: Purplish flowers
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-draining

Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea)

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Merethe Svarstad Eeg/EyeEm/Getty Images

Bougainvillea is only hardy in zone 9 and up, but you can opt to grow it as an annual or bring it indoors for the winter. It’s technically a vine, not an upright plant, so you will need to provide some support for it to grow vertically. Still, it’s a vigorous grower, and its blooms look stunning crawling up a wall or trellis.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Purple, red, orange, yellow, pink, or white blooms
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Humusy, acidic, well-draining

Boxwood (Buxus sempervirens)

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Jennifer Lang/FOAP/Getty Images

Boxwood shrubs can be formal or funky. The real fun of using this plant is you can trim it to be anything you want. If you would like to exercise your creative flair, try a boxwood topiary. When left to grow, it can reach heights of about 5 to 15 feet. Choose a pot with good drainage, as boxwoods can suffer from root rot. Also, a little shade during the hottest part of the afternoon is preferable.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 8
  • Color Varieties: Dark green to yellowish-green
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Loamy, evenly moist, well-draining

Canna Lily (Canna × generalis)

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John Burke/Getty Images

With their large, showy flowers, canna plants can add instant tropical flair to a container garden. In most zones, this plant is an annual, but you can attempt to carry it through the winter indoors in a sunny spot. On the plus side, it will flower multiple times throughout the summer, and its cultivars grow from about 2 to 6 feet tall. Cannas need lots of water and actually prefer “wet feet,” so be vigilant about keeping the container moist.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 8 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Yellow, orange, red, or pink flowers
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Rich, slightly acidic to neutral, moist

Dracaena (Dracaena)

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Dracaena plants can grow upward of 10 feet tall in containers, and there are many varieties to choose from. They are not hardy and need to be moved indoors for the winter. In fact, many people choose to grow them solely as houseplants. When grown outdoors, they are fairly low maintenance and can handle somewhat shady conditions that many other plants can’t tolerate.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 10 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Foliage of green, blue-green, burgundy, gold, or gray
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-draining

Dwarf Alberta Spruce (Picea glauca)

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F.D. Richards/Flickr/CC By 2.0

The dwarf Alberta spruce is a gorgeous conical evergreen with dense, bright green needles. It is a bit scratchy, so wear gloves when working around it. Choose a small tree when planting in a container. The term “dwarf” simply means it is slow growing, but the tree can reach 12 feet or taller. On the plus side, it can take around 25 years to mature. This plant requires a delicate balance of even moisture and good drainage when grown in a container. If you live in a dry climate, you might have to water frequently.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 3 to 8
  • Color Varieties: Green
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Sandy, loamy, or clay; moist; well-draining

Elephant Ear (Colocasia esculenta)

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Elizabeth Fernandez/Getty Images

Elephant ear manages to be both imposing and fun at the same time. The plant sports large, arrow- or heart-shaped leaves that some say resemble an elephant’s ears, hence its common name. It reaches about 3 to 6 feet tall but only grows as an annual in most hardiness zones. When grown in a container, be sure to water the plant regularly, as it likes a moist environment.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 8 to 10
  • Color Varieties: Foliage of green, yellow, chartreuse, or black
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Rich, humusy, medium to wet

Feather Reed Grass (Calamagrostis x acutiflora)

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Roger Smith/Getty Images

Feather reed grass is a cool season grass, which means it is an early riser in the spring and blooms early in the season. After flowering, it remains upright and tall, not floppy or weepy like many other grasses. It is perfect for the center of a container, growing from 3 to 5 feet. It prefers damp soil and can even tolerate poor drainage.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 9
  • Color Varieties: Green to yellow-green leaves; yellow, pink, red, or white flowers
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Average, medium to wet

Fountain Grass (Pennisetum setaceum ‘Rubrum’)

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anand purohit/Getty Images

Fountain grass looks good all season, with its burgundy leaves, spiky purple flowers, and purple-tinged seed pods. It has a wonderful way of swaying in a breeze and adds a rush of sound to your container garden. It also can make a good screen at 3 to 5 feet tall, giving you some privacy but still allowing sight. If you live outside of its hardiness zones, you can overwinter the plant indoors. Place the container in a relatively cool room with sun exposure, and water it sparingly. Bring it back outside once the danger of the last frost has passed.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 10
  • Color Varieties: Shades of burgundy
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Average, medium moisture, well-draining

Fuchsia (Fuchsia)

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For a container in a shady spot, you can’t do better than a fuchsia plant. These plants bloom throughout the entire growing season with no deadheading (removing spent blooms) necessary. Look for an upright variety, such as ‘Baby Blue Eyes’, ‘Cardinal Farges’, or ‘Beacon’, if you want it as a focal point. Fuchsia is susceptible to root rot, so be sure you select a container with adequate drainage holes, and use a fast-draining potting soil.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 8 to 10
  • Color Varieties: Purple, pink, red, or white blooms
  • Sun Exposure: Part shade to full shade
  • Soil Needs: Fertile, moist, well-draining

Hibiscus (Hibiscus)

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Bill Brennan/Getty Images

Hibiscus plants look tropical, but many varieties are hardy to some cold. These multi-branched shrubs can easily be trained into flowering trees and grown in containers. Use a well-draining potting mix, and avoid a very deep container to prevent the plant from expending too much energy on developing roots. Chinese hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) can reach around 10 feet tall while rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) can push 12 feet.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11 (tropical hibiscus)
  • Color Varieties: White, red, pink, orange, yellow, peach, or purple blooms
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Loamy, moist, well-draining

Mountain Cabbage Tree (Cordyline indivisa)

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Joshua McCullough/Getty Images

The mountain cabbage tree looks like a small palm tree and makes an intriguing focal point in a container. It is not hardy below zone 9, but you can bring it indoors for the winter. Just be sure to keep the plant warm, and give it lots of light. In a container, it will grow to about 3 to 6 feet tall with a high-quality, well-draining potting mix. Trim back leggy stems when necessary.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Greenish-white to purplish-brown blooms
  • Sun Exposure: Part shade
  • Soil Needs: Fertile, moist, well-draining

New Zealand Flax (Phormium tenax)

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The Spruce / Marie Iannotti

New Zealand flax is a spiky plant that can add color and interest to a container garden. With its rigid, sword-shaped leaves, the plant can reach around 4 feet tall when grown in a container. Choose a rich, organic mix over a regular potting soil for your container, and water the plant regularly. It should be brought inside to a sunny spot before the first frost if you live outside of its hardiness zones.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Green, bronze, purple, pink, red, or orange foliage
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Average, evenly moist, well-draining

Princess Flower (Tibouchina urvilleana)

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Wagner Campelo/Getty Images

If you love a tropical look, princess flower—also known as purple glory flower—is a beautiful evergreen shrub with stunning purple flowers. The plant grows well in containers on sunny patios, though it should be brought inside before the first frost. Also, place the container in a location that has some shelter from strong winds. Under ideal conditions, it can grow to about 6 to 8 feet.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 9 to 11
  • Color Varieties: Purple
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Rich, acidic, well-draining

Sweet Bay (Laurus nobilis)

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Craig Roberts/Getty Images

Bay trees are beautiful and functional: You can pluck fresh bay leaves right from your container. Bay grows slowly in a pot and can be pruned to maintain a manageable size of less than 10 feet. In its natural environment, however, the plant can grow as tall as 60 feet. You can trim it into a topiary or leave its natural shrubby shape. The plant typically grows slowly in a container and doesn’t mind being a little cramped. However, make sure you use a pot that’s sturdy enough not to tip over. Sweet bay is not hardy but overwinters well indoors.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 8 to 10
  • Color Varieties: Yellowish-green blooms, deep green foliage
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Soil Needs: Rich, moist, well-draining

Yucca (Yucca)

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Feifei Cui-Paoluzzo/Getty Images

Yucca plants are about as hardy as you can get, and the newer cultivars are pretty enough to be the focal point of a container garden. Even the smaller varieties still grow to roughly 2 to 4 feet in height and width, so select a good-sized container. They do not always bloom in containers, but many people choose to cut off the flower stalks anyway and focus on the spiky foliage. Make sure you use a container with good drainage, and avoid overwatering to keep the soil on the drier side.

  • USDA Growing Zones: 5 to 11 (depending on the variety)
  • Color Varieties: White, pink, purple, or green blooms
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Soil Needs: Dry to medium moisture, well-draining

Tall potted plants help to give a focal point to a container garden. These 20 plants can add height variety and drama to the landscape.