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Which Fertilizer Element Encourages Flowering Growth in Plants?

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Flower growth on a plant is an essential part of the plant’s reproduction. The healthy growth of plants requires all fertilizer elements; a lack of one can result in many symptoms. While all elements play a role in plant development and, subsequently, flower development, phosphorus is the element most responsible for stimulating stronger bud, fruit and flower development.

Primary Nutrients

Plants require 16 nutrients for growth. Three of these are taken from air and water: carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Of the remaining essential nutrients, three are considered primary nutrients: nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. These three are taken up in larger amounts by plants, are the most commonly deficient in soil and are the three most commonly applied. The three-digit number on a package of fertilizer is known as the N-P-K rating and lists the percentage ratio of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, respectively.

Phosphorus’ Role

Fertilizers specifically formulated for bud and bloom development are often higher in phosphorus than the other two primary nutrients. This is because phosphorus is a vital nutrient involved in stimulating and enhancing bud development and set, seed formation and blooming. It can help quicken a plant’s maturity, as well. It’s also vital in photosynthesis and respiration. Root-stimulating fertilizers are also often higher in phosphorus than the other two primary nutrients because phosphorus helps strengthen young roots and gives them a strong start.

Roles of Nitrogen and Potassium

While phosphorus is the element most associated with flower growth and production, nitrogen and potassium, along with the secondary nutrients and micronutrients, are all vital. Nitrogen is a major element in amino acids, often called the “building blocks of life.” Nitrogen stimulates stronger green growth, which provides healthy stems and leaves while promoting fruit and seed production; nitrogen also helps stimulate growth in roots and is necessary for the uptake of other nutrients. Potassium, on the other hand, is vital to several areas of plant growth, including drought tolerance, disease resistance, stem strength, improved texture, color and flavor of fruits, and photosynthesis.

Bottom Line

A deficiency in one nutrient can cause lackluster performance by plants, including stunted flower growth. But most soil is sufficient for flower production, especially when amended with rich, organic material and all other plant requirements are met. Using a flower fertilizer, or one specifically designed for bud and bloom production, may help in the long run but probably is not necessary. If you’re unsure, perform a soil test to see if your soil is lacking in any of the essential nutrients.

With a professional background in gardening, landscapes, pests and natural ecosystems, Jasey Kelly has been sharing her knowledge through writing since 2009 and has served as an expert writer in these fields. Kelly’s background also includes childcare, and animal rescue and care.

Which Fertilizer Element Encourages Flowering Growth in Plants?. Flower growth on a plant is an essential part of the plant’s reproduction. The healthy growth of plants requires all fertilizer elements; a lack of one can result in many symptoms. While all elements play a role in plant development and, …

Phosphorus or Potassium during flower.

.Smoke
Well-Known Member

Have read different views.
What do you all raise most during flowering? P ir K?

homebrewer
Well-Known Member
Saffasteve
Well-Known Member
Hydro4life
Well-Known Member

Have read different views.
What do you all raise most during flowering? P ir K?

homebrewer
Well-Known Member
.Smoke
Well-Known Member
Renfro
Well-Known Member

Have read different views.
What do you all raise most during flowering? P ir K?

Saffasteve
Well-Known Member
Hydro4life
Well-Known Member
homebrewer
Well-Known Member

I’d use a veg formula from start to finish then. Halving the recommend dose is a good place to start.

Hydro4life
Well-Known Member

I’d use a veg formula from start to finish then. Halving the recommend dose is a good place to start.

It depends on your medium/growing method.

Saffasteve
Well-Known Member

I’d use a veg formula from start to finish then. Halving the recommend dose is a good place to start.

It depends on your medium/growing method.

JayBio420
Well-Known Member

Start with increasing nitrogen in veg, Increase your P based on the size/growth of your plant at end of veg and during preflowering, increasing it during flowering, peaking just before maximum bud size, and K increases in relation to the change between veg and flowering, but plateaus in relation to the spike that P does.

That’s how I do it anyway. I’m really looking for more info and opinions on this myself.

homebrewer
Well-Known Member
.Smoke
Well-Known Member

I’d use a veg formula from start to finish then. Halving the recommend dose is a good place to start.

It depends on your medium/growing method.

Just switched to a veg formula that is 17-18-28.

Soil is an organic mixed with a lttile Miracle Gro Potting Soil
Have been feeding with a 24-8-16 so far for 6 weeks from seed now.
They started out under old florescent basement lights and just went under a 315W CMH a couple days ago.

Net is 48″X48″X68″
Pots are 17 Gallon.

I’m thinking maybe another month for Veg?
What do you all think?

Have read different views. What do you all raise most during flowering? P ir K? First grow btw..