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Composting Cannabis Waste: 5 Benefits of Composting

In this post, we are going to share 5 benefits of composting cannabis waste. The cannabis industry is composed of multiple verticals that all produce undesirable organic “waste” and “byproduct”. However, there is a sustainable and ecological responsible tool to re-use organic waste. Instead of tossing it into the landfill, composting is a beneficial tool that can sequester carbon and add more nutrients to the soil. This closed-loop waste system is commonly used by organic farmers to save money and aids in re-growth for the new season.

Composting Cannabis Waste: 5 Benefits of Composting

A common reason why cannabis products are thrown away is due to compliance issues with the state (frequently THC or pesticide content). Other reasons include bad or expired edible batches, post-extracted manufacturing waste, and the usual stalk, stems, and leaves after trimming.

When batches fail the inspection they are frequently thrown away in the standard waste-stream system or in extreme cases, finds its way into the black market at the expense of the general public. Populations engaged in the illegal sale of marijuana are at risk of ingesting or smoking cannabis harboring chemical contents that are hazardous to human health.

Remaining cannabis byproduct is hauled off to the landfill, where it anaerobically decomposes. As organic waste decomposes in these conditions it produces methane, a greenhouse gas that is 84x more potent than carbon dioxide.

Composting utilizes aerobic conditions that sequester carbon and promote healthy microbial growth. Cultivators can use compost to increase soil fertility, fight against plant diseases, improve water retention and quality.

Contributed by: Stephani Smith

Stephani is a GAIACA intern and currently a student at California State University Monterey Bay, studying Environmental Studies.

Learn how composting is a sustainable, ecologically-responsible way to re-use organic waste from cannabis products for any manufacturer.

Compost for marijuana?

TeamLoud53
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iamaaror
Well-Known Member
kamut
Active Member
TeamLoud53
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bob jameson
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trichome fiend
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georgyboy
Active Member

You should not compost in a sealed container or things will quickly get anaerobic and stinky. Oxygen is an important part of healthy decomposition. My indoor vermicompost bin is a plastic tote with drills holed in the bottom for drainage and along the sides and top for some air exchange. Outdoors, I compost in an old rabbit cage and I have pvc pipes with holes drilled in them that I shove into the compost pile to supply air right to the center of the pile. My composting happens very fast.

As for cannabis specific compost, I would add all of your root balls after you harvest, as well as all large leaves and stems you don’t use for hash, to an otherwise normal compost bin.

Rising Moon
Well-Known Member

I would say, this is wrong for the most part.

Manure is not necessary for nutrient rich compost.

In fact, when legumes like clover, alfalfa and vetch are composted, the resulting compost is just as rich, if not richer, than if a cow had eaten those same plants and pooped them out.

Check out this link for a good compost recipe:

Jack Harer
Well-Known Member

I would say, this is wrong for the most part .

Manure is not necessary for nutrient rich compost.

In fact, when legumes like clover, alfalfa and vetch are composted, the resulting compost is just as rich, if not richer, than if a cow had eaten those same plants and pooped them out.

Check out this link for a good compost recipe:

Well-Known Member

This is not necessarily the case! It all depends on the microbes you are cultivating within the compost. Bokashi composting, for example, uses an anaerobic process to create compost. Yes, you heard me. Anaerobic. This is the opposite of most composting processes, but due to the bacteria within the bokashi (lactobacillus), the organic matter is converted into good stuff, not alcohol. If you had yeast in the bucket this would be a different story.

Please don’t go spreading misinformation. As this is your first post, I would say make sure you are certain about your facts before you emphatically tell other people what you believe is true. There are a lot of folks on here who will take anyones word as fact.

SnakeByte
Active Member

My “compost” is wormless.
I’ve been adding plant matter from veggies and house-plant trimmings to a coir, construction sand, and worm castings mix in an open-lid clear container. Also throwing in some Ammonium, Molasses, H2O2, and unsweetened Cocoa powder. It all seems to decompose rather quickly if mixed once a day. I have my Ph meter coming in this week so I have no idea at the value right now.

Now as I understand it, beneficial bacteria in the soil is what breaks this stuff down to release the usable nutrients for plants.
What seems to be as important as adding material to be broken down, is the addition or maintenance of these micro-bacteria.

So I’m wondering what is the best way to incorporate these into the soil.
-Do Worm Castings contain these?
-Are there “tablets” one can buy – Sort of like the beneficial bacteria tabs for septic tanks?

Jack Harer
Well-Known Member

This is not necessarily the case! It all depends on the microbes you are cultivating within the compost. Bokashi composting, for example, uses an anaerobic process to create compost. Yes, you heard me. Anaerobic. This is the opposite of most composting processes, but due to the bacteria within the bokashi (lactobacillus), the organic matter is converted into good stuff, not alcohol. If you had yeast in the bucket this would be a different story.

Please don’t go spreading misinformation. As this is your first post, I would say make sure you are certain about your facts before you emphatically tell other people what you believe is true. There are a lot of folks on here who will take anyones word as fact.

While anaerobic composting can certainly be done effectivly, the downsides of odor, time and toxic pathogens make it less than desirable. Aerobic composting and AACT are FAR easier to research, easier on the olfactory senses, and safer in the long run http://www.ecoevaluator.com/lifestyle/gardening/anaerobic-composting.html It’s really not misinformation dude is spreading, just the major school of thought. You certainly wouldn’t put human waste in your compost, but I am told that Milorganite is safe. Maybe it is, I dont know. But I DO know that rabbit poo and EWC are safe and FAR less disgusting.

My “compost” is wormless.
I’ve been adding plant matter from veggies and house-plant trimmings to a coir, construction sand, and worm castings mix in an open-lid clear container. Also throwing in some Ammonium, Molasses, H2O2, and unsweetened Cocoa powder. It all seems to decompose rather quickly if mixed once a day. I have my Ph meter coming in this week so I have no idea at the value right now.

Now as I understand it, beneficial bacteria in the soil is what breaks this stuff down to release the usable nutrients for plants.
What seems to be as important as adding material to be broken down, is the addition or maintenance of these micro-bacteria.

So I’m wondering what is the best way to incorporate these into the soil.
-Do Worm Castings contain these?
-Are there “tablets” one can buy – Sort of like the beneficial bacteria tabs for septic tanks?

Has anybody ever experimenting making a compost for your own marijuana plants? Which are the best methods for what goes in it