Is It Illegal To Bring Weed Seeds On A Plane

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The circumstances were perfect: I was meeting up with one of my best friends from college… If you're thinking of traveling with weed in your baggage, here is what you need to know. The laws are not as simple as you might think. Free Consultation – Call 323-655-5700 – William Kroger aggressively represents the accused against charges in Criminal Defense & Crime cases. What If I Get Caught with Weed While Flying? – Los Angeles Criminal Defense Lawyer

What will TSA actually do with your weed if you’re traveling between two states where it’s legal?

FILE – A TSA employee searches the luggage of a United Airlines passenger at a security checkpoint at San Francisco International Airport on Aug. 10, 2006. TSA officers are required to report any suspected violations of law, including possession of marijuana and cannabis infused products. While they don’t search for marijuana or other illegal drugs, in the event they find an illegal substance, they will refer the matter to a police officer to enforce state law.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Show More Show Less

Denny sits for portrait during narcotics K-9 training at the Oakland International Airport on Thursday, May 11, 2017, in Oakland, Calif. The dogs and the handlers are training to spot many types of drugs, excluding marijuana. Amid legalization of marijuana, California’s current pot-sniffing K-9s face retirement.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle Show More Show Less

5 of 60 Bob Burns was the wit behind TSA’s Instagram account, before he passed away in 2018. He had been working with TSA since 2002 and was largely responsible for its social media presence. He posted photos of items that people tried to take through TSA checkpoints and failed miserably. Here are a number of recent ones, with his commentary. TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

7 of 60 TSA: “We need to talk about your flare. If you want to express yourself, this is the wrong kind of flare. You need flair. 37 pieces to be exact. … This flare gun was discovered in a carry-on bag at Honolulu (HNL). Flare guns are only permitted in checked bags without the flares.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

8 of 60 TSA: “9 out of 10 dentists recommend not hiding knives in toothbrush handles. This small pocketknife was discovered inside the taped handle of a toothbrush at Cleveland (CLE).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

10 of 60 TSA: “A Milwaukee (MKE) traveler found himself behind the eight ball after this concealed knife was discovered in his pool cue. All knives are prohibited, and concealed knives can lead to fines and arrest. #Scratch” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

11 of 60 TSA: “Satan’s fidget spinner was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV). While normal #FidgetSpinners are permitted, this one is a weapon.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

13 of 60 TSA: “This traveler must have been under the impression that they’d have to blaze a trail to get to their gate at the Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

14 of 60 TSA: “I’m guessing you pull the pin to get it to walk? Inert grenades, real grenades or anything resembling a grenade is prohibited altogether from being brought on a plane. This grenade creature was discovered in a carry-on bag at Albuquerque (ABQ).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

16 of 60 TSA: “This gives ‘protection’ a whole new meaning. However, fines stink, and concealed items such as this knife in a deodorant container can lead to a fine and even an arrest. Don’t sweat it; just pack your knife in your checked bag. Also, stick deodorant (without a knife) is permitted in carry-on bags in any amount. It’s the liquid, gel and aerosol deodorant that must adhere to our liquid rules. This was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Bradley International Airport.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

17 of 60 TSA: “Foiled again! Some are under the impression that tinfoil can make things invisible. #Nope This knife was discovered in carry-on bag wrapped in foil at Houston (HOU).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

19 of 60 TSA: “‘Paging Davy Crocket to the security desk…’ This powder horn full of black powder was discovered in a checked bag at Boise (BOI). Black powder is an explosive and is strictly prohibited in both carry-on and checked bags.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

20 of 60 TSA: “We’ve got nothing against propane and propane accessories, but dang it, Bobby, you can’t pack two propane tanks in your checked bags. Propane has a propensity to explode and is prohibited all together from air travel. These were discovered at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (ANC).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

22 of 60 TSA: No. Unga bunga. Ooog smork nag gralk. (Please pack in checked bag.)” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

23 of 60 TSA: “This inert explosives training aid was brought through the checkpoint at Columbia (CAE). It wasn’t an in-house test; it was left in the carry-on bag of a traveling soldier who said he uses it as a training aid. It hasn’t been confirmed yet whether or not the X-ray operator needed a stiff drink after their shift . Even though it’s inert, it’s prohibited due to the fact that it looks so realistic.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

25 of 60 TSA: “Apparently, even rocket scientists have trouble packing their bags. This model rocket and engines were discovered recently in a checked bag at Greenville (PGV). All rocket engines are prohibited in both carry-on and checked baggage.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

26 of 60 TSA: “According to Wikipedia, the M224 60 mm Lightweight Mortar is a smooth bore, muzzle-loading, high-angle-of-fire weapon used for close-in support of ground troops. #ProTip – Even though they were unloaded, you can’t declare and check mortar tubes with your checked bags as you would with firearms. This one was discovered at the Antonio B. Won Pat International Airport in Guam (GUM).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

28 of 60 TSA: “This replica of @AMCTheWalkingDead’s “Lucille” was discovered recently in a carry-on bag at Atlanta (ATL). The barbed wire is actually made from rubber and the blood is fake (we hope). However, baseball bats are prohibited from carry-on bags and must be packed in checked luggage. #TWD #Negan We’re just glad Lucille wasn’t thirsty.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

29 of 60 TSA: “This gives ‘photo shoot’ an entirely different meaning. The camera was fine as a carry-on, but due to its similarity to a firearm, the handle/grip/trigger mechanism needed to be placed in a checked bag. This was discovered in a carry-on bag at LaGuardia (LGA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

31 of 60 TSA: “While good food can be scarce on an aircraft, there’s no need to resort to the hunger games. This collapsible bow and arrows were discovered in a carry-on bag at Chicago O’Hare (ORD)” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

32 of 60 TSA: “This wasn’t prohibited, but when an actual lunar sample comes through a TSA checkpoint, you’ve got to mention it! @NASA Exhibits Specialist John Oldham was happy to let our Dane County (MSN) officers and fellow travelers take a closer look at the rock. The sample was collected during the #Apollo15 mission in 1971. It was the first mission to use the Lunar Roving Vehicle and 170 pounds of lunar surface material was collected and brought back to earth. #NASA rocks!” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

34 of 60 TSA: “This is an oldie but a goody. These shotgun shell Christmas lights were discovered back in December of 2012 in a carry-on bag at the Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR). All ammunition whether real or replica is prohibited from being transported in carry-on bags. This traveler wasn’t up to anything malicious, so they likely still made Santa’s nice list that year.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

35 of 60 TSA: “Newark (EWR) traveler attempted to take their hoe on the plane. If you need to travel with your gardening hoe, it’ll have to go in your checked bag.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

37 of 60 TSA: “A box of festively wrapped heroin was discovered in a checked bag at Los Angeles (LAX). This is an example of why our officers have to open gifts at times. They don’t enjoy it, but if there’s an anomaly inside, they have to check it out. We’re not looking for drugs, but in this case, it was nothing but drugs. When narcotics are discovered, our officers must notify the police.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

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38 of 60 TSA “This pair of disgruntled throwing knives are throwin’ some serious shade at their owner for packing them in a carry-on bag. All knives must be packed in checked bags. These were discovered at Chicago O’Hare (ORD).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

40 of 60 TSA: “If you’re looking for that stunning shade of lipstick, this bejeweled stun gun disguised as lipstick might just do the trick. It’s sending shockwaves through the fashion community. It was discovered in a carry-on bag at Baltimore (BWI).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

41 of 60 TSA: “What you’ve got here is a one-pound container of gun powder. It was discovered in a traveler’s checked bag at Anchorage (ANC). Powdered Eggs?…Protien Powder?…Powdered Peanut Butter?…Gun Powder❌ #Nope” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

43 of 60 TSA: “Oooooh! Ahhhhh! It’s that time of year again where we remind everybody that fireworks and firecrackers are not allowed in carry-on or checked bags. These were all discovered recently at Houston (IAH) and Wichita (ICT). #Fireworks” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

44 of 60 TSA: “Elementary, my dear Watson. Some people need a little help when they’re on their feet, but in order to bring a mobility aid onto an aircraft, it cannot double as a deadly sword or immobilizing stun gun. Most people do not realize they have a sword in their cane. Best to check. From left to right, these sword canes and stun cane were discovered in traveler’s carry-on property at Ft. Lauderdale (FLL), Phoenix (PHX), and Salt Lake City (SLC).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

46 of 60 TSA: “There’s a modern convenience in aircraft today called the overhead light that negates bringing fueled up lanterns on the aircraft. As you guessed, fueled up lanterns are not allowed in carry-on or checked bags. The only way this lantern would be permitted is if it was empty and had no traces of fuel at all. This was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on property at the San Diego International Airport (SAN).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

47 of 60 TSA: “This weapon will not only help you defend yourself against Orcs, but it also allows you to butter two slices of toast at the same time! This one was discovered in a carry-on bag at Chicago Midway (MDW). Please pack items such as this in your checked bags.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

49 of 60 TSA: “Why does this gigantic teddy bear look so sad? He was abandoned by his owners at LAX after the airline and TSA determined that he was just too big to be screened as a carry-on and taken on the plane. (UPDATE) After watching a YouTube video posted by the traveler, we’ve learned that he’s a popular YouTuber and this was a stunt to see if he could get the giant bear on the plane. . (He) had actually bought a ticket for the bear. After the airline and TSA decided the bear was too large, the airline offered to refund the ticket and the traveler was given the option of checking the bear as checked baggage. The traveler opted not to check the bear and left it behind.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

50 of 60 TSA: “Sometimes prohibited items write their own captions. Knives of any size are not allowed in carry-on bags. Please pack them in your checked bags. This knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at LaGuardia (LGA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

52 of 60 TSA: I’m not sure why you’d bring this into the cabin of an aircraft. I mean… if there is a bear on the plane, he bought a ticket same as you. Would you want a bear to walk up to your seat and spray you with mace? Doubtful… Now if you’re out in the forest and he’s trying to steal your pic-a-nic basket, that’s a different story. All varieties of mace are not allowed in carry-on property. Mace can be packed in checked baggage, but bear mace canisters usually exceed the allowable volume of less than four ounces. it also must have less than a two percent active ingredient of either CS or CN. It’s best to purchase the bear mace at your destination. This canister of mace was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Seattle – Tacoma International Airport (SEA).” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

53 of 60 TSA: “Holy cow! This cattle prod was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Chicago Midway (MDW) Airport. All shocking devices, especially cattle prods, are not allowed in carry-on bags. Please pack them in your checked bags with the batteries removed.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

TSA: “Billy the Kid would know better than to bring a knife to a gunfight. This gun knife was discovered in a carry-on bag at Des Moines (DSM). All knives, even souvenir gun knives, are prohibited from being packed in carry-on bags. Please place them in checked bags. #TSAGoodCatch”

56 of 60 TSA: This should spark some conversation. It’s a mobility device. It’s a self-defense weapon. It’s not allowed in your carry-on property because it delivers 1,000,000 volts! Shocking, we know. This was discovered recently in a traveler’s carry-on property at the Kahului.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

58 of 60 TSA: “Just as Batman had to lecture Boy Wonder about fastening his bat-belt, we find ourselves once again reminding readers that Batarangs are not allowed in carry-on bags. These were discovered in a carry-on bag at the Dallas Love Field Airport (DAL). #BOOM #CLASH #KABAM” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

59 of 60 TSA: “Talk about throwing a wrench into your travel plans… This monkey/grasshopper wrench was discovered in a traveler’s carry-on bag at the Will Rogers World Airport (OKC) in Oklahoma. Tools over 7” must be packed in checked baggage.” TSA/Instagram Show More Show Less

The circumstances were perfect: I was meeting up with one of my best friends from college for our first visit to Portland, Ore., and held the eager anticipation of what kind of antics we would get into during the exciting weekend ahead. Yet, preparing for this short vacation led me to Google something I’ve never searched for before:

Is it legal to bring marijuana on a plane from one state to another if it’s considered legal in both states?

Most websites’ answers were a resounding, seemingly obvious “no.” Go ahead, laugh at my naivety all you want. But after spending most of my life in the Midwest where recreational marijuana legalization seemed to be a far-off pipe dream, I honestly didn’t have a clue. Nor did I think it was a question I would ever have the opportunity to ask.

Sure, I knew I could just buy whatever I wanted when I arrived in Portland, but after spending money on plane tickets, a few nights’ stay in a hostel, and knowing I had other pending expenses ahead, I didn’t want to drop even more cash on something I already had – legally.

I even took to Reddit to ask people on r/trees (a go-to subreddit for everything related to cannabis with over 1.3 million subscribers). Most of the responses there ranged from caring – “I wouldn’t risk it, your weed will be waiting for you when you get back home :)” – to curt – “good luck getting caught and going to jail LOL.”

So, I went the safe route and left my edible gummies I was planning on bringing at my apartment and begrudgingly purchased more when I got to Portland. Still, I knew I wasn’t the only one questioning this legality. Whether you’re traveling to Portland like I was, or other big cities where recreational marijuana is legal – say, Seattle, Denver, Las Vegas, or Boston – it seems contradictory to have to leave your cannabis products at home when the law is giving you the green light in both your own city and destination.

That’s not to mention medical patients who need certain strains in order to combat chronic pain or alleviate symptoms of an illness. It was simple for me to just leave my weed at home, but what about patients for whom stopping usage can be detrimental to their health and well-being?

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Long after I returned from the trip, I had the answer to my question, but still wanted the details. Are CBD products okay at airports? Is a TSA dog really going to sniff me out? Jenny L. Burke from the Transportation Security Administration provided me with some answers that might help you on your next journey.

The short answer:

As soon as you head into that airport, marijuana is considered a controlled substance and is therefore illegal from a federal perspective.

So, carrying a joint through the TSA checkpoint at a California airport is illegal?

Yes – but that doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily get in trouble if you get caught. TSA says that officers are required to report “any suspected violations of law, including possession of marijuana and cannabis infused products.” That being said, your weed likely isn’t their priority – the safety of everyone else is. TSA’s screening procedures are security-focused and designed to look for “potential threats” to aviation and passengers.

Is It Legal to Take Marijuana on a Plane?

As far as marijuana is concerned, its legal status is confusing for many in the United States. The issue of bringing cannabis on an airplane is a perfect case in point. It is a federally illegal substance like heroin. Consequently, one would assume that carrying it onboard an aircraft is a prohibited act.

Conversely, you may think it is okay as long as you fly from one ‘legal’ marijuana state to another. Neither supposition is accurate as shades of gray continue to cause problems. This article outlines if you can or should bring cannabis on a plane.

Marijuana & Airplanes – The Law in General

Cities own airports. However, the federal government is authorized to operate them, and federal law supersedes state law. It doesn’t matter if you buy your marijuana legally. It becomes an illegal substance from the moment you show a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agent your boarding pass.

Yet even then, the issue is far from cut and dried. The TSA is tasked with keeping planes and passengers secure. They are far more concerned about finding explosive devices than marijuana.

The TSA’s screening procedures mean detecting potential threats. As a result, they are not actively looking for drugs, so you could technically sneak through without a problem. However, the likely outcome is that a TSA agent will find the cannabis and hand you over to airport security.

The Amnesty Box

When an airport security agent gets involved, there are several possible outcomes. Airports such as Aspen-Pitkin County in Colorado or McCarran in Las Vegas, Nevada, have a special ‘amnesty’ box. Passengers can place their cannabis in this box and not face any legal consequences. This is primarily because recreational use is permitted in these states.

If you’re fortunate, a police officer might wave you through with the marijuana if you have a valid MMJ card. However, this is an infrequent occurrence. You are far more likely to meet a law enforcement official who takes a dim view of your actions. While local police may not press charges, the federal government could potentially get involved.

It is a felony to transport ‘for-sale’ weed outside a state according to most states’ laws. It is also a federally illegal act. If you are caught with a large amount, you could spend several years in prison. The majority of cases that end up in court are tried on a state level. This is better news for the defendant because it increases the chances of a favorable outcome.

What About the Legal Marijuana States?

Don’t assume that taking cannabis from one recreationally legal state to another (Colorado to California, for example) is permissible. If a TSA agent finds marijuana or another illegal substance during security screening, the default policy is to contact law enforcement. Your destination and location of origin are not taken into account. The response of the TSA to cannabis at the airport is consistent across the United States.

Don’t assume that taking cannabis from one recreationally legal state to another is permissible.

Will you be arrested in an airport in a recreational state? The answer is: “It depends.” Officials are lenient in certain airports, such as John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California, for example. Therefore, airport police won’t charge you with a crime if you have a state legal amount. You won’t be allowed to bring it onboard, however.

The likely response depends on the airport rather than the state. At Denver International Airport, for example, marijuana is banned anywhere on airport property. It is a very different story at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).

LAX Is Lenient Regarding Marijuana Possession

Cannabis has been legal for recreational use in California since January 1, 2018. On the same day, LAX updated its marijuana policy. According to the airport’s official website, Los Angeles Airport Police Division (LAPD) officers have no jurisdiction to arrest anyone in possession of marijuana. That is, as long as you carry it following state law.

At the time of writing, passengers at LAX are allowed to travel through security with up to 8 grams of concentrated marijuana and 28.5 grams of marijuana flower. The policy also applies to several other airports under APD jurisdiction.

Traveling with weed? Here’s al…

It doesn’t mean you can go through security openly carrying cannabis. A TSA agent can stop you and contact the police as per the usual protocols. The difference is that the APD will arrive and wave you through.

Also, you can be arrested for cannabis possession when you land. Alicia Hernandez, a public information officer for the APD, spoke to Rolling Stone magazine a few years ago. She said that the APD “doesn’t concern itself with other state laws or whether travelers will be violating them upon their arrival.” Therefore, please make sure you check marijuana laws at your destination before boarding the plane.

A Risky Business

For the most part, law enforcement is not concerned about passengers carrying small amounts of cannabis. Even so, it is very much a case of ‘carry at your own risk.’ If you need it for medical purposes, make sure you have your MMJ card and don’t attract unwanted attention. Make sure there are no liquids in your bag, and there’s a chance that your edibles will go unnoticed.

It is very much a case of ‘carry at your own risk.’

It is a bad idea to try and bring oils or tinctures on board. The mere fact that they are liquid immediately draws attention. Edibles are much harder to detect, especially if you make them yourself and package them like everyday food items. Edibles also have less of a smell. In contrast, you are more likely to get caught if you try to bring cannabis flower through.

If you are caught, don’t object, complain, or get angry with the TSA agent. There is no point trying to talk your way out of the situation. Make sure you display your MMJ card if you have it. There is no real defense for interstate transportation, so stay silent, and ask for an attorney if you get arrested.

Is It Legal to Take Weed on a Plane? Final Thoughts

The issue of whether or not you can bring cannabis on a plane is straightforward if you look at a strictly legal definition. Airports are under federal purview. Marijuana is a federally illegal substance. Therefore, you can’t legally bring marijuana through airport security.

What If I Get Caught with Weed While Flying?

With weed being legal in California, more and more people are showing up to airports like the Santa Monica Airport hoping to bring their weed along with them. However, many people may not know that they can still face penalties for attempting to bring weed onto a flight, even though it may be legal in California. What happens if the TSA catches you with weed?

Since marijuana is legal in California, the TSA will likely confiscate the weed should they find it during the screening process. However, they may still contact local authorities if the amount of weed in your possession is too high or if you are not of a legal age to possess it.

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If caught with illegal amounts of weed, you may face penalties pursuant to §11357 of the California Health and Safety Code.

While weed is legal here in LA, the situation remains more complex due to the nature of air travel. We’ll discuss more in detail below.

However, if you are currently facing charges for possession of marijuana, contact us at 323-655-5700 to schedule a free consultation to discuss the details of your case. William Kroger is an expert in drug law and has more than two decades of experience dealing with marijuana related charges of all types. The sooner you contact us, the sooner we can begin preparing your defense.

Penalties for Marijuana Possession When Flying in LA

The first, and most important, aspect to understand about marijuana and air travel is that the TSA operates under federal jurisdiction, not state. While weed may be legal within California law, the TSA is bound by federal law, and therefore could technically notify federal law enforcement.

However, they are unlikely to do so.

  • The most likely outcome is that they will simply confiscate your weed. The DEA is almost never notified for cases involving marijuana in airports, and the TSA won’t bother notifying local authorities unless you possess large amounts or are not of legal age. In those cases, you may incur penalties which we’ll discuss below.
  • It is still not recommended to attempt air travel with marijuana in your possession. It’s still illegal to possess marijuana on an airplane due to federal regulations. You also need to consider your destination; if marijuana is illegal there, you will likely face harsher penalties if it is found when you land.

Since recreational marijuana is legal in California, what would happen if an LA resident got caught with weed in somewhere like the Santa Monica Airport?

The short answer is that, in California, if you are over 21 and caught with a legal amount of weed, the TSA may simply confiscate it. However, it is still not advised to attempt air travel with marijuana, especially if it is not legal in the state you are flying to.

There are several circumstances where the TSA may still contact local law enforcement, such as when you break California state law. We’ll discuss this below.

Penalties for Marijuana Possession in LA Airports

If you are caught in an airport with illegal amounts of marijuana, or are not of legal age to possess marijuana, local law enforcement may charge you with penalties pursuant to §11357 of the California Health and Safety Code (HSC):

  • If you possess less than 28.5 grams of cannabis or 8 grams of concentrated cannabis (wax, oil, or resin) and you are:
    • Over 21 – possession is legal
    • Over 18 but under 21 – punishable by a fine up to $100
    • Under 18 – punishable by a four hours of drug counseling and up to 10 hours of community service
    • If you possess more than 28.5 grams of cannabis or 8 grams of concentrated cannabis and you are:
      • Over 21 – punishable by a misdemeanor and up to 6 months in county jail and/or a fine of up to $500
      • Over 18 but under 21 – punishable by up to six months in jail or a fine of up to $500, or both
      • Under 18 – punishable by up to 10 hours of drug counseling and up to 60 hours community service

      No. Medical exemptions for cannabis are irrelevant outside of the state in which the exemption is issued, and airplanes are under federal jurisdiction so there are no exemptions to the illegality of cannabis.

      If you are flying between states, then your medical marijuana card will likely not be valid in the state you are traveling to anyway.

      What if I’m Flying Between Two States Where Weed is Legal?

      It is still illegal even if you are traveling between states where weed is legal. The airplane you are traveling on is technically under federal jurisdiction where cannabis is illegal.

      Instances where travelers are caught attempting to cross state lines with drugs can be prosecuted more harshly and with larger penalties. This is why, even though the TSA may not find it, it is not wise to attempt travel across state lines with marijuana in your possession.

      Will the TSA Find Weed in My Checked Bag?

      Probably. It is more likely that the TSA will find weed in your checked luggage because checked bags are randomly searched at a higher rate than carry-ons. Just like you, your checked bag goes through a number of screening procedures to ensure there is nothing illegal or dangerous in it.

      If you try to hide large amounts of marijuana in your bag, you may be detained when you land and exit the plane. Your cannabis will likely be confiscated and you may be faced with legal action for the possession of large amounts of marijuana, especially if you are travelling to a state where it is illegal.

      Can I Take Hash/Oil/Edibles on a Plane?

      No, you cannot take any form of cannabis on a plane. Hash, oil, resin, wax, and edibles are all considered forms of concentrated cannabis, which is regulated under the same laws as flower, but possession limits are lower.

      In California, you may only legally possess 8 grams of concentrated cannabis compared to 28.5 grams of flower cannabis.

      Does the TSA Look for Marijuana?

      In an Instagram post on the TSA’s official account, they clarified that TSA screening procedures are focused on identifying potential threats to airport security, and, as such, TSA officers do not specifically search for marijuana during the screening process.

      However, just because they aren’t looking for it doesn’t mean they won’t find it. TSA screening procedures regularly reveal drugs of many types. There may also be sniffing dogs present at the airport.

      In California, drug dogs and their handlers likely won’t do much with personal amounts of marijuana other than simply confiscating it for disposal. Still, it’s safer not to take that gamble and leave your weed at home when traveling.

      What if I am Found with Weed After Landing in LA?

      If you are found with legal amounts of weed after landing in LA and are on your way to exit the airport, they won’t do anything. You are unlikely to be found in the first place since arriving passengers are not typically screened at all.

      Realistically, you are on California soil with an amount that is legal in this state, so they probably won’t care. If you possess illegal amounts, that is when it becomes an issue and you could be charged as described above.

      Marijuana Possession in Airports

      While you may not face any legal action for attempting to travel with personal amounts of marijuana here in LA, it is still not recommended to try. At the very least, it will likely be confiscated and you will lose it forever.

      If you attempt travel with larger amounts of marijuana, or are not of a legal age to possess it, that is when you may face more serious legal action from local enforcement agencies. Still, you can rest assured that if you forget or accidentally leave small amounts of weed in your bags when flying out of LA, it will likely just be confiscated.

      However, if you are currently facing any marijuana related charges, you should contact us immediately. William Kroger is an expert on marijuana law here in California and has successfully defended against drug charges of all types. If you need a criminal defense attorney here in LA, William Kroger and the rest of our trusted team here are your best option for a successful defense.

      Contact us at 323-655-5700 for a free consultation to discuss the details of your case.

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