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Galactus Seed

The Galactus Seed is an item that features in Marvel Comics.

Contents

History

Origin

The Galactus Seed, also known as the Worldheart, was an item that was actually a super dense cosmic heart created before the beginning of time at the hands of Eternity. Its intention was to give birth to the next universe to come and was formed before recorded time. The Seed was discovered by Bor, the First King of Asgardians with his sons Odin, Vili and Ve. After finding it, Bor planted the Seed in order to give birth to the current universe. In addition, the Seed was responsible for birthing the World Tree over which the Nine Realms resided.

Galactus claimed that the Seed was a cosmic aberration and mistake as it was an attempt by Eternity to correct a flaw that did not exist. He believed that it sprouting would lead to a new cosmos and an inexperienced entity that would replace him and bring about the end of existence quicker. (Fantastic Four v1 #600)

Siege Aftermath

After the destruction of Asgard over Broxton, the World Tree was split whereupon Odin ordered Thor along with Sif to retrieve the Seed from the depths. Odin later attempted to commune with the Seed in order to avert an impending prophecy that concerned the Asgardians. He placed it for safe keeping within the Destroyer armor that immensely empowered it with incalculable power. The Silver Surfer later arrived at this point in order to demand the Seed on behalf of his master Galactus. According to the Herald, the consumption of the Seed was capable of sating the World Devourer’s hunger forever.

Odin later rebuffed the Silver Surfer who had warned the Asgardians of Galactus’s coming. The All-Father explained thereafter to Thor that the Seed’s purpose was to birth the next universe and that Galactus’s consumption of it would stall the future thus destroying Galan forever. Ultimately, Galactus and the Silver Surfer battled the Asgardians for the cosmic relic. This saw Loki seeking the help of the Weird Sisters in order to save his brother and Asgard. Thus, he stole the Seed and took it down with him to the depths of the World Tree thus hiding it from everyone which included himself.

Whilst within the World Tree, the Seed remained anchored but if Earth was destroyed then it would be released and tumble through space to locations that were inaccessible. As a result, Galactus desired to acquire the Seed from the Asgardians and wanted to prevent it from going beyond his reach. (Fantastic Four v1 #600)

Galactus Seed The Galactus Seed is an item that features in Marvel Comics. Contents History Origin The Galactus Seed, also known as the Worldheart, was an item that was actually a

The Mighty Thor: The Galactus Seed

(The Mighty Thor (2011) (Collected Editions) #1)

It’s a shining, golden, new age for the Thunder God – and Matt Fraction and Olivier Coipel are back to lead the charge! Thor and Sif dive deep into the heart of the fractured World Tree to reclaim an artifact from beyond time and space, an artifact that attracts the attention of the Silver Surfer. And when a herald such as he arrives on Earth, the arrival of his master is It’s a shining, golden, new age for the Thunder God – and Matt Fraction and Olivier Coipel are back to lead the charge! Thor and Sif dive deep into the heart of the fractured World Tree to reclaim an artifact from beyond time and space, an artifact that attracts the attention of the Silver Surfer. And when a herald such as he arrives on Earth, the arrival of his master is certain to follow. Prepare for the return of the World Eater. Prepare for the return of Galactus!

Collecting: The Mighty Thor 1-6 . more

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What do you get when you combine two of my least favorite comic book sub-genres – Space opera and bowdlerized ancient mythology?

A sum that is only slightly better than its parts.

Personally, I’d be wetting myself right about now, but then, I’m not a thunder god.

Matt Fraction starts his run after the Siege event, which saw Asgard, home of the Norse gods, end up somewhere in the Oklahoma boonies. The World Tree has been rent asunder, Thor and Sif journey to the bottom and find a big glowing seed, w What do you get when you combine two of my least favorite comic book sub-genres – Space opera and bowdlerized ancient mythology?

A sum that is only slightly better than its parts.

Personally, I’d be wetting myself right about now, but then, I’m not a thunder god.

Matt Fraction starts his run after the Siege event, which saw Asgard, home of the Norse gods, end up somewhere in the Oklahoma boonies. The World Tree has been rent asunder, Thor and Sif journey to the bottom and find a big glowing seed, which sparks the interest and hunger of Galactus. Enter the Herald of Galactus, the Silver Surfer.

The seed could possibly taste like bacon (but probably chicken), which is why Galactus must have it.

This sets up the inevitable clash between the Asgardians and Team Galactus.

Ding. That’ll leave a mark.

This one will definitely leave a mark.

Loki’s a kid here and his involvement will become something familiar (read: oft copied) to future Thor readers: Loki does something mischievous (not really evil, after all he’s just a kid) in order to save Thor’s butt.

Rinse and repeat.

Subplot: Broxton residents are growing weary of the Asgardians and their dangerous shenanigans.

Suck it up. It could be a lot worse. Heh.

The cover – For some reason, this edition has a movie tie-in cover (Goodreads doesn’t have it as an available choice), which makes absolutely no sense whatsoever in terms of the plot. Plus, the story itself would make a poor gateway for anyone jumping into the Thor series based on interest garnered from watching one of the movies. For me, a seasoned comic reader (heh), I passed it by several times, thinking it was a movie prequel (or whatever) until I more closely examined the contents.

Jeff, wouldn’t the title be an indication that it had nothing to do with the movies?

Shut the hell up, Captain Obvious.

Bottom line: Fraction’s run gets better and his humor is in evidence here, it’s just that this match-up seems smooshed together for no good reason except for a bash-‘em up confrontation on a mega-scale.

Those two pervs, Patrick and Loki, get into trouble and get an ass-whopping from the Lady Sif.

Post-Fear Itself, Odin sends Thor diving in the World Tree for a powerful MacGuffin – a MacGuffin that will also satiate Galactus’ hunger finally so he’ll no longer devour worlds! But Odin’s not gonna give it up that easily. Time for a cosmic punch-up: Odin/Thor vs. Galactus/Silver Surfer!

I’m not a huge Thor fan but Matt Fraction and Oliver Coipel’s The Galactus Seed was a really good outing for the God of Thunder!

Like too many Marvel comics, there’s a lotta fighting in this one except it make Post-Fear Itself, Odin sends Thor diving in the World Tree for a powerful MacGuffin – a MacGuffin that will also satiate Galactus’ hunger finally so he’ll no longer devour worlds! But Odin’s not gonna give it up that easily. Time for a cosmic punch-up: Odin/Thor vs. Galactus/Silver Surfer!

I’m not a huge Thor fan but Matt Fraction and Oliver Coipel’s The Galactus Seed was a really good outing for the God of Thunder!

Like too many Marvel comics, there’s a lotta fighting in this one except it makes sense here because Thor is basically a barbarian who hits first and asks questions never! The fight between Odin and Galactus, two gods of incredible power, was imaginative though, playing weird mind games with each other’s memories rather than outright fisticuffs.

This was also the time Loki was Kid Loki, a much cuter and more sympathetic version of the character than we’ve seen before. Fraction makes him very likeable and his storyline was great too – he’s actually heroic (though there’s probably more to it than that)! Even a minor character like Pastor Mike is written as more than a one-dimensional Bible-thumper-type character which I’m sure Christian readers appreciated.

I felt that the reason why Odin refused Galactus the Worldheart/Cosmic Seed was contrived as there wouldn’t be a book without that conflict, and the Brigade of Realms subplot was pointless. Also, this book felt inconsequential as a whole: Thor gets magically wounded, though it doesn’t slow him down any, and the only major change happens to the Surfer – in a Thor book! It feels like a lot of fuss over nothing.

That said, I was surprisingly drawn into the story and enjoyed it a lot. Fraction’s writing is very good and Oliver Coipel’s art is superb – the pair make a fine team and the book comes together really nicely. If you’re after an excellent Thor comic, The Galactus Seed is worth checking out! . more

I’ve never been quite as fond of Fraction’s work as others seem to be, but given his reputation I’m willing to keep trying. The Mighty Thor is okay; there are some fun moments, and it does feature kid!Loki, who is probably the most interesting character in the comic. That whole refresh of Loki’s character remains interesting to me because it plays with all sorts of stuff, bringing back the ambiguity of his character from the original legends rather than any straightforward comicbook villain stuf I’ve never been quite as fond of Fraction’s work as others seem to be, but given his reputation I’m willing to keep trying. The Mighty Thor is okay; there are some fun moments, and it does feature kid!Loki, who is probably the most interesting character in the comic. That whole refresh of Loki’s character remains interesting to me because it plays with all sorts of stuff, bringing back the ambiguity of his character from the original legends rather than any straightforward comicbook villain stuff. (Some people don’t like that because it seems to be part of the woobification of Loki prompted by Hiddleston fans, but I see it there in the source material.)

Otherwise, the Galactus/Silver Surfer stuff seemed fairly routine — I knew how it’d go from playing Lego Marvel Superheroes, y’know? It’s not like there’s any real danger of Galactus being allowed to eat Earth. . more

I had to start this book three times to get far enough in to build reading momentum. I don’t know what it is about the start of this book, but it just did *not* grab me – perhaps the fey, airy colours used in the “action” scenes, or maybe it’s just that we get dropped into the middle of a set of “earth-shaking crises” that I didn’t for a moment believe wouldn’t get resolved by the end of the issue.

But it finally gets going in chapter 2, and the we’re off on a dangerous adventure. Prolly bringin I had to start this book three times to get far enough in to build reading momentum. I don’t know what it is about the start of this book, but it just did *not* grab me – perhaps the fey, airy colours used in the “action” scenes, or maybe it’s just that we get dropped into the middle of a set of “earth-shaking crises” that I didn’t for a moment believe wouldn’t get resolved by the end of the issue.

But it finally gets going in chapter 2, and the we’re off on a dangerous adventure. Prolly bringing the Broxton citizenry into it helped a great deal to make the threat real. Either way, it’s actually a relief to see that Fraction didn’t lose his talents for fun, big, crazy storytelling with a storyteller’s edge. For once, I actually feel some measure of. weight in the Silver Surfer’s words, not just an aloof being who doesn’t hold sway or matter.

So was it a good book? It’s hard for me to say. For me, it wasn’t magical, or mind-blowing – but it was somewhat inventive, had some big-scale action (though it came in fits and starts), and it brought a slight wrinkle to Marvel continuity. I was disappointed that Fraction merely toyed with the question of “god” vs. “gods”, but I guess Marvel wants to play it safe with the American right-wing terrorists after the Brubaker/Captain America dust-up a year or two ago.

Finally though I realise I’m wondering, after this and a previous Thor book by him that was no more entertaining: what’s Fraction doing writing Thor? It doesn’t seem like we’re getting 100% of his capabilities on this book – like he hasn’t *committed* to doing something creative, but just play within the rules. Seems a shame to waste his talents on this, so maybe it’s just part of his exclusive contract with Marvel – he needs to turn in more monthly pages, and this was the next-best book they gave him to work with?

Aside: I gotta say, the panel layouts on the pages are some of the most confusing I’ve ever seen committed in a *good* writer’s work. . more

This feels thin for the most part (the conflict is pretty basic), but Fraction does a decent job with these characters. He’s done better with others, but Thor’s cast isn’t poorly drawn in this outing. Silver Surfer’s a hard one to nail, no matter who’s writing. That said, Fraction does about as good a job as someone like Starlin did in past eras.

The most redeeming part of this volume is how Fraction tackles what would otherwise have been a thorny tale on religion. It doesn’t pull punches though This feels thin for the most part (the conflict is pretty basic), but Fraction does a decent job with these characters. He’s done better with others, but Thor’s cast isn’t poorly drawn in this outing. Silver Surfer’s a hard one to nail, no matter who’s writing. That said, Fraction does about as good a job as someone like Starlin did in past eras.

The most redeeming part of this volume is how Fraction tackles what would otherwise have been a thorny tale on religion. It doesn’t pull punches though also succeeds at being sincere in nature and a good philosophy to have present in Marvel’s “gods exist in a primarily Judeo-Christian world.”

I was glad to see Coipel remain as Thor’s artist after JMS’s noteworthy run. While the constant two-page spreads look beautiful, the linearity of the narrative gets handicapped. . more

The Mighty Thor book. Read 71 reviews from the world’s largest community for readers. It’s a shining, golden, new age for the Thunder God – and Matt Frac…